Awesome (Mostly Academic) Food Blogs

As we wrap up 2017, I want to give a shoutout to some fantastic (mostly academic) food blogs and websites that I have so much respect for and that I highly encourage our readers to check out. You will probably notice a slant towards blogs with an emphasis on feminism:

1) Restaurant-ing Through History 

Since 2008, food historian Jan Whitaker, has been writing one of the most amazing food blogs that exists. I cannot emphasize what a fantastic resource this blog has been for me over the years. She publishes new content about two to three times a month on American restaurant history.

2) Lost Womyn's Space

While it is not a "food blog" per say, this blog is filled with histories of lesbian and feminist restaurants and bars. It's goal is to "commemorate and honor lost womyn's space--both ancient and modern."

<also if anyone is able to connect me with the author, please email me at alexandraketchum (at) gmail (dot)com >

3) Who Needs Gay Bars?

Sociologist Greggor Mattson tracks the closure of lesbian bars in the United States.

4) To Live and Dine in LA

This website is a project of The Library Foundation of Los Angeles and is based on the Menu Collection of the Los Angeles Public Library. They publish menus and information about past restaurants in LA County. As I was born in LA and raised in LA and Orange County, this blog personally resonates with me.

5) The Greenwich Village Society for Historic Preservation

The GVSHP has created a public history mapping project, mapping the history of different spaces in the city. In 2017, they released a map that showed important spaces, including restaurants, to women's history in New York. They had previously released similar maps about social justice and civil rights.

6) The New York Public Library's Navigating the Green Book Guides

As you can probably tell, I am a big fan of library and archives' public history projects. These sites serve to connect with the public and make resources accessible to broader audiences who might never have the chance to visit the physical space.

This site allows users to plan trips using the The Green Book (also digitized here). The Green Book was a travel guide published between 1936 and 1966 that listed hotels, restaurants, bars, gas stations, etc. where black travelers would be welcome.

7) Anna Sigrithur Podcasts

Anna Sigrithur has created a series of mesmorizing podcasts for the Oxford Food Symposium and for the Nordic Food lab! Some of my favorites are the interview with historian Laura Shapiro about the Pillsbury Bake Off and the anthropology of slurping noodles! This spring, a new series will launch!

8) Lagusta's Luscious

Lagusta Yearwood founded a feminist vegan chocolate shop in New Paltz, New York. I highly recommend following her on social media.

9) Food Feminism Fermentation

Food, Feminism, and Fermentation (FFF) is an organization dedicated to bringing together scholars and makers working at the intersections of these three themes. Food, Feminism, and Fermentation hosts an annual conference, Leavening the Conversation. The website links to the FFF youtube channel which publishes videos of presentations from the conference. You can follow FFF on social media (facebook, twitter, and instagram). To be transparent, our editor, Alex Ketchum, is the co-founder.

Open Access Food Journals (meaning no pay-wall!!!):

a) Cuizine: The Journal of Canadian Food Studies

This fantastic interdisciplinary journal publishes peer reviewed articles in both English and French.

b) The Graduate Journal of Food Studies

Access some fantastic pieces working on the multidisciplinary field of food studies.

c) Canadian Food Studies Journal

Based out of UWaterloo, this peer-reviewed journal approaches food studies primarily from a social science perspective.


2 comments :

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  2. Thank you so much for including me in your list. I am touched to be in such good company! Jan Whitaker, Restaurant-ing through history.

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